Are you supposed to put a comma.afer ad?

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Tyrell Nitzsche asked a question: Are you supposed to put a comma.afer ad?
Asked By: Tyrell Nitzsche
Date created: Fri, Feb 5, 2021 11:43 PM
Date updated: Fri, Jul 8, 2022 2:48 PM

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The word and is a conjunction, and when a conjunction joins two independent clauses, you should use a comma with it. The proper place for the comma is before the conjunction. On Monday we'll see the Eiffel Tower, and on Tuesday we'll visit the Louvre.The word and is a conjunction, and when a conjunction joins two independent clauses
independent clauses
A subordinate clause is a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence; it merely complements a sentence's main clause, thereby adding to the whole unit of meaning. Because a subordinate clause is dependent upon a main clause to be meaningful, it is also referred to as a dependent clause.
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, you should use a comma with it. The proper place for the comma is before the conjunction. On Monday we'll see the Eiffel Tower, and on Tuesday we'll visit the Louvre.

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The comma after and is a very hot question. Some say it is no longer to be used, but some say it is. Seeing as the human race invented the language, you think we would agree.

Commas should sometimes be placed before – and after – names and titles. It all depends on the context. Let's start with the fact that unless a name or title is the last word (s) in a sentence, it can either be used with no commas at all, OR with a comma both before and after. Read remaining answer here.

Whether or not you put a comma before and depends on how you’re using and. There’s no single rule that applies to all situations. You usually put a comma before and when it’s connecting two independent clauses. It’s almost always optional to put a comma before and in a list.

Otherwise, you should not use a comma after “and.” Commas after “and”: when not to use them The simple truth is that you never need a comma after “and” because of the word “and” itself.

When you’re describing something with two or more adjectives, you can use a comma between them if those adjectives are coordinating. (They’re coordinating if you could place “and” between them.) You shouldn’t put a comma after the final adjective. For example: He’s a cheerful, kind boy.

Common starter words for introductory clauses that should be followed by a comma include after, although, as, because, if, since, when, while. While I was eating, the cat scratched at the door. Because her alarm clock was broken, she was late for class. If you are ill, you ought to see a doctor.

Use a comma to separate the name of a city from the state within which it is located. However, if you use the two-letter capitalized form of a state in a document, you do not need to place a comma after the state. I grew up in Tampa, Florida. I lived in Brooklyn, NY for six years. Comma Rule Fourteen

We use commas while combining multiple phrases in one sentence or writing about different items in a list. There are more usages of a comma, for example, how adding or removing comma before and after a name changes the meaning of the sentence — In this Grammar.com article let us understand how to correctly use commas with names. The same rules apply for titles.

The rules for using a comma before a conjunction like "and," "or," and "but" are not simple because it depends how the conjunction is being used and what writing convention you're following.

This hugely depends on context. In this case, commas indicate pauses. Many if-phrases usually need one: "If you're using commas at all, you need one in this sentence after all." Do you want people to pause slightly when reading the phrase? If so, ...

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